Watch This: Gordon Brown on Global Ethic

Gordon Brown’s Ted talk explaining how digital connections are leading to the development of a set of global ethics that are fundamentally changing the way that politicians do business remains one of my favorites because he’s right.

Using just a few digital tools, citizens of any nation can join together and elevate their voices—and elevating voices means gaining influence.  Policymakers can’t ignore—or control—the messages that we create together online.  

That’s an important lesson, isn’t it?  Shouldn’t we be actively teaching our students how to use digital tools to join together?  Isn’t learning to influence through electronic media an essential skill for successful participation in tomorrow’s society?

4 comments

  1. Bill Ferriter

    Crystal wrote: I enjoyed this post and found it quite interesting. It brought a new insight in to the way I view using digital tools in the school and around the world.
    Thanks for stopping by, Crystal—and I’m glad that this Gordon Brown video has you thinking.
    For me, it forced a shift in my focus on using digital tools to publish interesting content to a focus on using digital tools to organize and influence.
    It’s almost like the fundamental behaviors required for participating in a democratic society are changing because of Web 2.0 tools—and that’s a change that our students need to know more about.
    Does any of this make sense?
    Bill

  2. Crystal

    Hi my name is Crystal and I am currently taking Dr. Strange EDM 310 class. I enjoyed this post and found it quite interesting. It brought a new insight in to the way I view using digital tools in the school and around the world. I feel that this film captured the true significance of using technology! It is very true it shows what the world could be like for those that need help and cannot receive it due to the fact that they do not have access to technology! I am pleased that this world is coming to a world filled with technology.

  3. Bill Ferriter

    Whitney wrote:
    The internet gives us citizens the ability to communicate with each other in a faster and more effective way.
    Hey Whitney….Glad that you’re monitoring my blog this semester. Keep me honest, huh? Push back against my crazy ideas every now and then.
    Let me push back against yours here: Don’t you think that this bit from your comment is THE most important lesson for our kids to learn?
    I mean, if schools are still responsible for teaching students to be participants in a democratic society, isn’t learning to use digital tools to elevate voice and influence policymakers essential?
    Should we be creating little advocates who know how to develop messages that pack a punch and can be heard through the digital noise?
    I guess what I’m saying is haven’t the behaviors necessary for “successful participation in a democratic society” changed because of Web 2.0 tools—and should we be teaching students about those changes?
    Bill

  4. Whitney Bosarge

    Hello my name is Whitney Bosarge, I am in a EDM 310 class at the University of South Alabama. I was assigned to comment on your blog. This video was very interesting and I like the point you made. I agree that digital tools are necessary for the future of the classroom. By having such tools students have a better way of communicating not only with their classmates about what they are learning, but also they can communicate with other children across the world that might be learning about the same subject. When I was a student in school we had hardly any access to these tools, now I see how much easier things would be now if I would have learned more about them in school. Also what you said about using digital tools for political reasons, I also agree. The internet gives us citizens the ability to communicate with each other in a faster and more effective way.