Digital Advice for School Leaders . . .

On Wednesday, I'll have the chance to present to the technology committee of our school district's Division of Principals.  In the process of preparing, I asked my network the ONE bit of advice they thought school leaders interested in driving change in their own buildings needed to hear.

Many of the responses shared the same theme — a theme that was summarized nicely by Tim Wilhelumus, who wrote:

 

In the end, driving change in schools means remembering that technology alone isn't revolutionary.  Technology just makes it possible for teachers and students to do revolutionary things. 

Our choices about technology need to start and end with our beliefs about learning. Forgetting to put learning first in ANY conversation about education is a recipe for failure.

I also loved Jon Becker's advice:

 

Jon's right, isn't he?  Principals ARE the lead learners in our schools.  Your modeling means everything to us — and that includes the example that you set when exploring the ways that new tools and social spaces can change learners. 

Finally, Steven Anderson's point is worth noting:

 

Whatever you do, move forward.  Take the digital plunge — and bring some friends!  Learn together.  Experiment.  Figure out what's possible and what matters.  Change your own learning and then start changing the learning in your buildings.  

Any of this make sense? 

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 Related Radical Reads:

Making Good Technology Choices 

Doubting Bauerlein's Dumbest Generation 

Reflections on Teaching for Tomorrow

Teachers, Chainsaws and the Dreaded Interactive Whiteboard

Technology Just Makes Good Teaching Easier

2 thoughts on “Digital Advice for School Leaders . . .

  1. Chris Sherman

    OK, as I see the three points being made here are
    1) Technology is a tool that can help us master the core content, and hopefully go much deeper.
    2) Administrators should model the use of technology particularly in the area of collaboration and communication.
    3) Administrators must be lifetime learners and one of the best ways of doing that is getting connected.
    Actually, this fits in quite well with Chapter 8 of Sheryl Nussbaum’s book The Connected Educator. My team of campus technology specialists is studying this book at the moment. The assignment for that chapter asked us to view some blogging post and I chose yours.
    Thanks,

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