Real Progress DOESN’T Happen in Leaps and Bounds [Slide]

I was feeling a bit creative today, so I decided to whip up a slide designed to challenge the notion that organizations can make huge strides in short periods of time:

(download slide and view original image credit on Flickr)

Hope it makes you think about the change efforts underway in your own buildings — and that you can use it somewhere in your work.

 

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Related Radical Reads:

Our Compulsive Obsession with the Impossible Sexy

Sustainable Change in Schools

Evolutionary Lessons for the Principals of PLCs

 

 

6 thoughts on “Real Progress DOESN’T Happen in Leaps and Bounds [Slide]

  1. Bill Ferriter

    Erika wrote:
    Ive noticed youve added two other slides to the slides you post. 1
    from flickr and the other almost a draft of your final slide. What is
    your reasoning behind this? Did I miss a post on why you are doing
    this? I love having teachers and students create slides for persuasive
    writing and to promote creative commons in pd. Please explain your
    change in process when you get a chance.
    Thanks again and keep up the good fight.
    _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
    Good to see you in this space, Erika — and jazzed that the slide is going to work for you! I love it when that happens.
    As far as the PPT file goes, I include 3 slides for a reason. The first is an uneditable slide. It is the slide that I use in my own slide decks — and by including it, I make it possible for anyone who doesnt have my unique fonts saved on their computers to see the slides as I intended them to look.
    The second is an editable slide. Thats why the fonts might looked jacked up on your machine. I include them, though, so people can edit the text content if they need to. The way I figure, sometimes finding the image for people is a ton of value in and of itself.
    The third slide is something that Ive just recently started to add — but it is nothing more than a screen capture of the original image on Flickr and its designed to serve as proof that the original image was licensed Creative Commons Attribution. One of the things that Ive noticed is that photographers sometimes change their licenses on images. By grabbing a screenshot, I can prove that at one point the picture was licensed CC.
    Most users will probably just delete the second two slides in that PPT file — but I include it anyway because thats how I store them on my machine.
    Hope this makes sense,
    Bill

  2. Erika Jordan

    Bill,
    Thanks for this slide. You have no idea how perfect your timing is with this slide; I can’t wait to use this with one of my districts.
    I’ve noticed you’ve added two other slides to the slides you post. 1 from flickr and the other almost a draft of your final slide. What is your reasoning behind this? Did I miss a post on why you are doing this? I love having teachers and students create slides for persuasive writing and to promote creative commons in pd. Please explain your change in process when you get a chance.
    Thanks again and keep up the good fight.

  3. Dan Winters

    Brilliant
    I love the phrase “If you aint cheating, you aint’ trying”. Makes me a little skeptical of those too hard to believe improvements.

  4. Shawn Blankenship

    Hi Bill,
    I am so glad you felt creative today! What a terrific image for an important quote. I will be opening a new school next August and I’m currently picking Rick DuFour’s brain to ensure I develop a Professional Learning Community successfully. New building, New Principal, New Teachers, 3 elementary schools feeding into one school. For real progress, it will be critical that we work collaboratively while taking one step at a time. I can’t wait to share this poster with our school community! Thank you.

  5. Hatchderek

    Hi Bill,
    Great slide! I always tell people that we have been working since the industrial revolution to get to this point in education…we are not going to change things over night.
    Thanks for the visual…
    Derek

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