Category Archives: PLCs

Need a Form for Analyzing CFA Data? Try This One.

One of the differences between teachers working in a traditional school and teachers working in a professional learning community is that teachers in a PLC engage in regular cycles of inquiry, investigating their practice together to identify and amplify instructional strategies that work for kids.

Fab Lentz

That “inquiry around practice” is centered around four basic questions that the teachers on teams answer together:  What do we want kids to know and be able to do?   How will we assess student progress towards mastering the skills we identify as essential?  What will we do for students who haven’t mastered the skills that we identified as essential?  And what will we do for students who are working beyond the skills that we identified as essential.

There’s nothing particularly intimidating about this work.  In fact, many teachers would argue that answering those four key questions has always been a part of what good teachers do.

But in order to have a long term impact on both student mastery and teacher practice, teams have to be deliberate about documenting what they are learning.

Without a long term record of the outcomes of each cycle of collaborative inquiry, lessons learned are simply lost over time.

To be deliberate, my learning team developed and then started using this form when analyzing common formative assessment results last year.  We dug it primarily because it forced us to move beyond simply making observations from the data sets that we were collecting.  It  also required us to define the next steps that we were going to take as a result of the observations that we were making together.

Here’s a sample of what a completed form looks like.

There’s a problem in our form, though.  Can you spot it?

While we are carefully documenting what WE are learning from the data sets that we collect, the form that we developed does nothing to encourage us to identify what individual STUDENTS are learning connected to the concepts that we are trying to teach.

That’s a problem, y’all.  If we are committed to the notion that every student should master the standards that we identified as essential, we MUST track progress by both student and standard.  Having a general idea of the patterns that we are spotting in our data sets can help us as individual teachers to improve our practice, but until we have specific lists detailing which students have mastered the essentials and which students are struggling to master the essentials, it is impossible to move forward in a systematic way.

So we’ve been tinkering with a revised form lately.  Check it out here.  

Did you see the chart we added onto the second page of the form?  It’s an adaptation of a form that we pulled from Common Formative Assessment — a fantastic book written by Chris Jakicic and Kim Bailey.

What we love about the new chart is that it forces us to sort our students into four different categories ranging from “This student hasn’t yet acquired the foundational skills/ideas necessary to master these concepts” to “This student has demonstrated that they are working beyond your grade level expectations and are in need of additional challenge.”

The reason that “sorting” of students is important is because each of those groups of students are in need of different levels of support/intervention.  While it is often easy for teams to name the students who haven’t mastered essential outcomes — most teachers can probably generate those lists before ever even giving an assessment — focused, timely intervention depends on understanding WHY a student hasn’t mastered essential outcomes yet.

Our new form forces us to think about that in advance.

Does this make any sense to you?  More importantly, does YOUR team need a new system for documenting what you are learning from the assessments that you are giving?

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Related Radical Reads:

Common Formative Assessment is About Improving INSTRUCTION.

Ten Tips for Writing Common Formative Assessments

 

 

 

Note to Learning Teams: It’s Time to Complete Your Mid-Year Checkup

As a guy who has written and presented and consulted on the power of PLCs for over a decade, I’m always surprised by how little learning teams do to monitor their own health. 

We write norms and outline a plan of action for our meetings at staff development days in August — and then we file those norms and action plans away in our team folders, never to be opened again.

No wonder we get frustrated with the progress we are making together.  Without the regular implementation of clearly stated and agreed upon structures to govern our work, weekly meetings can end up feeling like a giant waste of time.

So here’s a challenge for you:  Sometime in the next two weeks, sit down with your colleagues and complete a mid-year checkup.

Clark Tibbs

 

Here’s how:

Step 1:  Have your team leader add all of your team’s commitments to the first column of this Team Meeting Evaluation Strip.  Include both norms that are supposed to be governing your team’s weekly meetings and any specific structures or plans that were important to your team back in August.  Here’s a sample of a completed Team Meeting Evaluation Strip.

Step 2: Set aside time for every teacher to reflect privately on whether or not your team is doing a good job honoring your commitments to one another.  Explain to team members that any “NO” votes need to be backed up with both reasoning and suggestions for improvement.

Step 3:  Copy your team’s commitments into the first column of this handout.  Hang a poster sized version of the handout in a private space that team members can access.  Ask team members to use sticky dots to indicate whether or not they think your team is honoring your commitments to one another.

Step 4: Use the completed “Sticky Dot Chart” to start conversations about the overall health of your learning team at your next meeting.  Areas receiving lots of “NO” votes need to be revisited. Why is it that your team is struggling with those commitments to one another?  What can be done to tighten your work in that area?

The simple truth is that the health of learning teams has to be monitored and addressed if collaboration is going to produce motivated teachers and meaningful results for kids. 

The time you invest in reviewing the commitments that you’ve made to one another is time you invest into making your team stronger.

#itmatters

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Related Radical Reads:

Note to #atplc nation:  Norms Really DO Matter

The Importance of a Clear Vision

Just How Important IS the Composition of a Professional Learning Team?

 

Is Your Team “Flunking Unsuccessful Practices” Together?

Over the summer, I had the chance to hear Eric Twadell — the Superintendent of Stevenson High School District 125 in Illinois — deliver a keynote at a Solution Tree PLC Institute.

While his whole keynote was amazing, Eric shared a quote from a book called How Children Fail — which was written in 1964 by John Holt.  Holt’s goal was to study the characteristics of highly effective schools.

His main finding about exceptional schools is as relevant today as it was when first written over 50 years ago:

“The researchers then examined these schools to find what qualities they had in common.

Of the five they found, two struck me as crucial: 1) if the students did not learn, the schools did not blame them, or their families, backgrounds neighborhoods, attitudes, nervous systems, or whatever. They did not alibi. They took full responsibility for the results or non-results of their work.

2) When something they were doing in the class did not work, they stopped doing it, and tried to do something else. They flunked unsuccessful methods, not the children.”

Those are two really easy filters to evaluate the work that you are doing together, y’all. 

If you catch yourself coming up with alibis to explain away the struggles of your students, change is necessary.

And what change is the most important to embrace?  Start studying your practices in a systematic way.

Put evidence behind the impact that those practices are having on students — and then amplify those that work the best and give up on those that are doing little to move your kids forward.

The good news is that there’s nothing difficult about any of this.

Studying practices in service of student learning should already be a regular part of the way that you are doing business.

#trudatchat

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Related Radical Reads:

What Role Do Hunches Play in Professional Learning Communities?

Interventions are NOT Optional.

Our Compulsive Obsession with the Impossible Sexy. 

 

Common Formative Assessment is about Improving INSTRUCTION.

Recently, I stumbled across this fantastic Ken Williams video about Common Formative Assessment on the YouTube:

Ken’s right, isn’t he.

All too often, we use CFAs to “sort and select and move on to the next step” in our schools, forgetting that instructional reflection is the second leveraging arm of the common formative assessment process.

Stated more simply: CFAs aren’t JUST about identifying students in need of remediation and enrichment.  CFAs are about encouraging teachers to address the strengths and weaknesses in their own practice.

Interested in starting that conversation with your faculty?  

Here’s a handout that I’ve been using along with Ken’s video in professional development sessions this month.

#hopethishelps


Related Radical Reads:

Ten Tips for Writing Common Formative Assessments

 

 

Does Your School have an “Avoid at All Costs” List?

A few weeks back, I shared the story of Carl, a principal friend of mine who was frustrated with the pockets of innovation in his building.

While he knew that good work was happening at all grade levels and in all subject areas in his school, that work was inconsistent.  Some teachers were running with technology integration but ignoring a school-wide reading program.  Others had made PBIS work on their teams or in their classrooms, but did little to integrate the 4Cs into their day-to-day instruction.

My push back to Carl was simple:  Pockets of innovation are almost always evidence of a lack of focus in a school building.  Carl’s faculty wasn’t being resistant by letting important school-wide initiatives fall by the wayside. They just didn’t have the mental bandwidth to make several different significant changes at one time and had decided to prioritize some practices while tabling others.

That’s a survival strategy, y’all.

So what can YOU do to avoid falling into the same trap?  Start by stealing an idea from Warren Buffet and developing an Avoid at All Cost list!

Here’s how:

1).  Make a list of 25 things that your school is currently working on — or that you anticipate working on over the next few years.

Include everything that matters to you and/or your district.  Are you rolling out new devices?  Has your state mandated new diagnostic testing for students in specific grade levels?  Are the NGSS science standards pushing their way into conversations in your district?  Is your school tinkering with intervention or enrichment periods?  Write it all down.  And then have your teachers review it to be sure you haven’t inadvertently missed anything.

2). Circle the five most important items that you find on your current list of projects, programs and priorities.  

Are some of the projects, programs and priorities listed in step one more important than others?  Why?  How do you know?  Which ones are valued by classroom teachers?  Which will have the most direct benefit on student learning?  Are some mandates that can’t be ignored?  Do some have the support of the communities that you serve?  Is your school uniquely suited to implement some initiatives over others?  Structure conversations — within learning teams, during leadership meetings, with parents and students — to get feedback about your five priorities.

3). Invest EVERYTHING into moving forward on your five most important priorities.

Now truly invest in your priorities.  Every purchase that you make should have a direct connection to one of your five priorities.  Every scheduling decision that you make should be tied to one of your five priorities.  Every faculty meeting that you have, every professional development session that you provide, and every message that you share with your parents, teachers and students should focus on one of your five priorities.  Practice what Doug Reeves calls lifeguard leadership and keep your attention on the things that really matter.

4). Turn the remaining 20 items that you have been working on into an Avoid at All Costs list.

The real mistake that schools make when trying to drive change is focusing on too many different projects all at the same time.  That makes every single one of the remaining items on the list you generated in step one a potential pitfall.  Sure, they matter — but when everything becomes a priority, nothing gets done.

So make it clear to everyone in your school community that those items are to be avoided at all costs until the five priorities you settled on in step two have become a part of the fabric of your school.  No matter how much potential you see in the remaining 20 items brainstormed in your original list, you have to push them completely aside if you are truly setting priorities.

You see what’s happening here, don’t you?  

The key to keeping your school focused and moving forward isn’t just identifying a small handful of priorities.  The key to keeping your school focused and moving forward is identifying a small handful of priorities AND actively pushing against everything else that threatens to draw your collective time and attention away from the things that matter most.  Developing an Avoid at All Costs list can help you to do just that.

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Related Radical Reads:

Pockets of Innovation = Lack of Focus

School Leadership is a lot Like Lifeguarding

How Clear is YOUR Vision?