Category: Teachers Reflect on their Practice

Want Better Faculty Meetings? Start Here.

Last week, I blogged about my decision to write “Kudos Cookies” notes to my students.

A simple idea built on a suggestion from my friend Chris Tuttell, Kudos Cookies are short, handwritten notes of praise paired with a sweet treat.  I write anywhere from two to eight notes every morning — depending on how much time I have after arriving at school — and make deliveries all day long.

The entire experience has been fantastic.  Not only are my kids surprised and thankful for the kind words that I’m sharing, my own spirit is buoyed every morning by the simple act of showing gratitude to the kids in my classroom.

But as I try to convince colleagues to write their own notes to kids, I’m hit with the same response over and over again: “That’s such a great idea!  I’m impressed you are doing it.  But I just don’t have the time.”

Now don’t get me wrong:  I understand the time crunch all too well.  I’m behind in paper grading right now simply because I’ve chosen to spend 20-30 minutes every morning writing to kids instead of scoring assignments.  I’ve also been slow at replying to emails in my inbox — which I imagine is frustrating the dozens of people who need answers from me every single day.  The truth is that even I feel pressure to quit writing to my kids because I’ve got a ton of other things that need to get done.

Think about how heartbreaking that is, all y’all.

How did we get to the point where writing kind notes to kids is something that we can’t find the time for?  How many items on our To-Do lists would have a GREATER impact than telling our students that we are proud of them and spotlighting moments where they have impressed us?  If I quit writing and caught up on my grading and answering my email, would our school be a better place?  Would I be a better teacher?  Would my students be better learners?

Of course not.  The BEST thing I do each day is write to my students.  Each note strengthens a relationship and builds the confidence of a kid.  Nothing else matters more.

#simpletruth

The good news is that Matt Townsley and Santo Nicotera have found a solution.  Both are starting every faculty meeting with the same agenda item:  Writing positive notes to two kids that are hand delivered the next morning.

How awesome is that?

Imagine a room full of teachers spending a few minutes together reflecting on the strengths of individual students.  Imagine a building where written expressions of gratitude became a norm instead of an exception to the rule.  Imagine the positive message sent about priorities when writing to kids was the first thing done whenever teachers gathered together.  And imagine the frame of mind teachers would be in for the rest of the faculty meeting or professional development session after thinking about the kids that they serve.

And THEN imagine the joy that would ripple through your building on the morning after a faculty meeting or professional development session.  

Have 30 staff members?  Sixty students are going to start the next day with a tangible reminder that they ARE successful learners and that their teachers DO believe in them.  Wouldn’t that make your school a more joyful place?  Isn’t that what we mean when we talk about building a community of learners?  Aren’t kids more likely to respond to hand-written notes from the important adults in their lives than to the PBIS points and trinkets that you are currently giving to encourage positive behaviors in your school?

And 30 staff members are going to start the next day with a moment to show gratitude to your students — a behavior that we often overlook in schools because we are too darn busy.

So how do you get started?  Here are a few ideas:

Build 10-15 minutes into your meeting agendas for writing positive notes:  It doesn’t take long to write, guys.  I can write six notes in twenty minutes.  Setting aside ten to fifteen minutes is plenty of time for two notes.

But here’s the thing:  This has to be the FIRST item on your agenda.  Not only will that help by putting teachers in a positive, student-centered frame of mind at the beginning of your faculty meeting, it will ensure that you aren’t tempted to cut letter writing from your agenda because you run out of time at the end of the meeting OR put teachers in the position where they have to decide between writing a meaningful letter or going home at the end of a long staff development session.

Bring school-inspired stationary for every teacher to write on:  I write on cards that are 4 by 5 inch squares.  Four fit on one piece of 8 by 11 card stock.  On the front is a colored, school themed logo.  The cards are big enough for me to say meaningful things but small enough for me to fill in five minutes — so I don’t have to spend forever writing.  Print a stack of these.  Have someone cut them before your faculty meeting.  Ask teachers to pick up two as the enter your meeting — or hand out two at the door as teachers arrive.

Interview kids who have received letters:  The easiest way to convince teachers that writing to kids matters is to interview a few students and get them to talk about the letters that they’ve received.  One or two short videos of kids saying things like, “I felt noticed when I received my letter” or “I wasn’t sure my teacher liked me until I got my letter” will help to cement the notion that time spent on writing letters is well worth it.

Ask every staff member — not just teachers — to write letters:  Don’t forget that your custodians, classroom assistants and office staff members have positive relationships with kids, too.  In fact, they often have positive relationships with students who don’t stand out on the radar of classroom teachers.  Asking them to join your letter writing project will help to ensure that every kid is recognized over the course of the school year.

Recruit parents, the PTA, or your Family and Consumer Science classes to bake Kudos Cookies for you:  My students love the letters that I write.  They COULD be the only thing that you hand out to students.  But let’s face it:  My students also love the cookies that they get, too!  It makes getting a letter from me an extra special treat.  So talk to your parents or your PTA or your Family Consumer Science classes.  Give them a list of your faculty meetings and professional development days.  Have them bake cookies that you can hand out with your letters.  It’s a simple way to spread this project beyond just your classroom teachers.

NEVER skip letter writing:  Never.  Like ever.  The minute that letter writing is bumped from your agenda, you are sending the message to your staff that all of the other items you grind through — details on the new dismissal procedures, reports from the district’s financial planner on changes to your 401K plans, mandated video training on blood borne pathogens or sexual harassment in the workplace — matter more than showing gratitude to kids.  That’s what got us in this pickle to begin with!

So whaddya’ think?  Is this something you can see doing in your faculty meetings?

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Related Radical Reads:

When Was the Last Time YOU Wrote a Positive Note Home to Parents?

Simple Truth:  Kids Want to be Noticed

Writing Positive Notes to my Students is the Best Way to Start the Day

 

Writing Positive Notes to My Students is the BEST Way to Start the Day.

Regular Radical Readers know that I made a commitment last year to handwriting positive notes to the parents of all of my students (see here and here).  The entire project was awesome.  Parents appreciated hearing kind words about their kids and kids appreciated being noticed.

I started a handwritten note project again this week, but with a twist inspired by Christine Tuttell.  This year, I’m writing directly to my kids instead of their parents — and along with each note, I’m giving my kids a cookie:

Like Chris — who does a similar project with the staff members that she supports as an Instructional Technology Facilitator — I’m calling these daily gifts of positive words of praise paired with sweet treats “Kudos Cookies.”  Also like Chris, my main goal is just to spread a bit of joy every day.

And like last year, my kids are really enjoying receiving letters from me.  Every hand delivery has been met with smiles.  In fact, many mornings, I think I’m catching kids off guard simply because they aren’t used to getting direct praise from me.  That makes me feel bad — I wish I had the chance to give every kid direct praise every single day.  But the reality is that with 120 kids and 50 minute class periods, things move too fast in a middle school to interact with every child in a deep and meaningful way every day.

Here’s what’s interesting, though:  I get just as much benefit from the positive notes that I’m writing as my students do!

Starting every morning sitting quietly at my desk thinking about just what makes each of the kids in my room special matters.  It serves as a constant reminder that no matter how hard teaching can be, it is truly an amazing profession.  Better yet, it serves as a constant reminder that every kid sitting in my classroom has unique sets of strengths that are worthy of recognition and celebration.

That kind of intentional reflection about every single kid gives ME joy, too.  Better yet, that kind of intentional reflection makes me more tolerant in the moments when the wheels fall off during the course of the day for the kids in my classroom.  Because I’ve started the day by deliberately naming the strengths of my students, their weaknesses don’t leave me frustrated.

So whaddya’ think?  Are Kudos Cookies a project you’d ever consider tackling?  

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Related Radical Reads:

When Was the Last Time YOU Wrote a Positive Note Home to Parents?

Simple Truth:  Kids Want to be Noticed

 

Is Goal Setting Pointless?

Lemme ask you a question:  What role does goal setting play in your school’s culture?  

If your building is anything like mine, goal setting is probably a regular part of your daily routine.  There are goals in your school improvement plan, right?  And each learning team has their own SMART goals to pursue.  Teachers write goals for personal development as a part of their evaluation protocols — and goals litter individualized education plans for students with special needs.

That’s why James Clear’s bit titled Forget About Setting Goals caught my eye this morning.

Clear’s argument is worth considering:  Goal setting can be intimidating — and can result in feelings of failure or fear that leave people paralyzed.

Here’s an example from my personal life:  One of my goals is to lose 25 pounds in the next three months.  Frankly, I’ve got a closet full of clothes that I don’t fit into anymore — and I don’t have the cash to buy a “fat guy wardrobe” right now.

But losing 25 pounds right now seems next to impossible.  Mathematically, that’s 87,500 calories I have to lose.  If I burn about 600 calories per workout (which is what the ol’ treadmill keeps telling me), I’ll need 145 workouts to lose 25 pounds — and that’s ONLY if I quit eating like a Buffalonian in the winter-time.

Just reading that paragraph makes me want to quit before my “healthy living” kick even begins — and the minute I miss a workout or down a dozen wings while watching a playoff game, I’m going to feel like I’ve lost.  Those are pretty high stakes, right?  So in order to protect myself, I’m going to either set easier goals or completely ignore the goals that I’ve set to begin with.  That’s human nature.  We are good at self-preservation.

Clear would argue that the solution to my growing waistline ISN’T to set some kind of big, hairy audacious goal for losing weight.  Instead, it’s to concentrate on systems that result in weight loss.  

My attention should be focused on thinking carefully about what I am going to eat for every meal or building time for regular gym visits into my personal schedule.  Doing so concentrates my attention on practical steps that I can take to lose weight — and gives me a thousand opportunities to feel successful.  Each scoop of hummus that I choke down or trip to the gym that I take becomes a victory for me — and victories build momentum that will eventually help me to achieve the goal that I would have set for myself in the first place.

It’s an interesting argument, isn’t it?  

Goals are destinations.  Systems are vehicles that keep you moving forward — and moving forward is essential to winning.   “When you focus on the practice (systems) instead of the performance (goals),” writes Clear,  “You can enjoy the present moment and improve at the same time.”

Now I’ve got to figure out how to apply Clear’s argument to the work that I am doing in my school.  How can I prioritize practice over performance in order to drive my own professional growth, the growth of my learning team, and the growth of my students?

#thinking

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Related Radical Reads:

Three Tips for Building Teacher Buy-In

Does Your School Have an “Avoid at All Costs” List?

Pockets of Innovation = Lack of Focus

My New Year’s Resolution? Comment More and “Like” Less.

So here we are, 2017.  Pretty glad to see you, if you want to know the truth.  2016 was a year full of more turmoil and tragedy than I care to remember.  

I bet you are buried in promises today, right?  Doesn’t EVERYONE wake up on January 1st ready to make new commitments about how they are going to choose to live during your 365 days?  My guess is that you probably roll your eyes every time that someone casts their promises towards the heavens, knowing full well that most of those promises will be abandoned by the end of your first month.  Don’t believe me?  Go ask 2016.  He’s BOUND to tell you that promises made in the first minutes of a new year aren’t worth a hill of beans.

But I AM going to make a promise to you whether you like it or not:  I promise to spend more of my time behind screens reading and commenting on blogs and less time liking and retweeting the content that I consume.

Now I know what you are thinking:  “Nice promise, Bill.  Really ambitious.  So thankful that you are committed to making our world a better place by commenting more than liking.  You are a real Mother Teresa, aren’t you?!  Sheesh, these people.  So selfish with their resolutions.  Can’t SOMEBODY come up with a promise that matters?”

Here’s the thing, 2017.  I REALLY believe that commenting more and liking less WILL make the world a better place.  It’s NOT a selfish act.  

Here’s why:  No matter what people say, social spaces are decidedly antisocial nowadays.  Most of our interactions in Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or Pinterest are shallow on a good day.  We think mashing the like button or sharing someone’s post out in our own social streams is some kind of meaningful endorsement of the people we are learning from, but those acts require nothing of us — and show nothing to the creators who are sharing content in our streams.

I’m not trying to be all judgy here.  I know why we like and pin and share instead of comment.  We do it because it is fast and easy.

But make no mistake about it:  “Fast and easy” acknowledgement cheapens the value of the very spaces that we’ve embraced.  

Content creators stop seeing their audiences as people they are connected to and start seeing their audiences as people they are trying to sell their ideas to.  And audiences stop seeing the content creators that they follow as actual people who are reflecting transparently and pushing conversations forward.  Instead, content creators are just another brand in the marketplace shouting for attention.  What was supposed to be “networked learning” has become “a network for buying and selling ideas about learning.”  Each Tweet or Pin or Post or Favorite or Share is a transaction instead of a contribution.

Need a different way to think about it?  Likes and pins and retweets are nothing more than the digital equivalent of the Gingerbread soap you gave your grandmother for the holidays because you just so happened to be in the Bath and Body Works the week before Christmas.

Sure, Gingerbread soap is a gift.  No argument there.  But it’s not a thoughtful gift that you put time and energy into.  It was the easiest step you could take to fill your part of the gift-giving bargain and everyone — grandma included — knows it.  While you may not realize it at first, that bar of Gingerbread soap fundamentally changes your relationship with grandma because it is a sign of just how little you really want to think about her.  You’ll do it because you are supposed to — it IS a social expectation, after all — but not out of any real sense of gratitude for Grandma.

Am I making any sense, 2017?  

I guess what I’m saying is that I am making a commitment to LEARNING WITH rather than LEARNING FROM people this year.  I’m going to read and react to the ideas being shared by others.  I’m going to ask questions instead of look for answers.  I’m going to start conversations instead of share content.  I’m going to show people that I’m really listening — and that I’m grateful enough for their efforts and ideas to spend time wrestling with and responding to those ideas in their comment sections.

My bet is that every comment will strengthen the connections that I have with people.  Instead of seeing me as just another icon in their feeds, they’ll see me as a person with a voice who cares enough about them to react to what they’ve written.  Our relationships will be strengthened — something that can only happen one thoughtful interaction at a time — and stronger relationships matter.

Sure, it means that I’ll end up following fewer people.  I can’t magically double the amount of time that I have for interacting in social spaces.  But those fewer people will mean more to me — and hopefully, I will mean more to them.

So there’s my promise, 2017.  I’m going to be a better learning partner to people this year — and while it won’t solve global poverty or keep the Russians from taking over the rest of the world, it WILL encourage and empower more of my peers.  

That has to have some value, doesn’t it?

Respectfully,

Bill Ferriter

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Related Radical Reads:

I’m Going #toplessin215!  Who’s In?

In One Word, I Will Challenge.

 

Top Five Radical Reads of 2016

One of my favorite things about the end of December and the beginning of January are the summaries that bloggers share with their networks detailing the posts that drew the most attention in digital spaces.  By pulling the best pieces to the forefront, they make it easy for me to quickly find important thoughts that I missed in my feed reader during the course of the year.

Since 2011, I’ve done the same here on the Radical, spotlighting the five posts that had the highest number of page views during the previous calendar year.  For 2016, those posts were:

Writing Student Friendly Learning Goals — This bit, which was written way back in 2008, details the reasons that converting the jargon-heavy standards detailed in our curriculum into student friendly learning targets makes sense.  It also goes on to explain a simple process for converting objectives into student friendly learning targets and introduces Unit Overview Sheets — a tool that I use to communicate essential outcomes to the students in my classroom.

I’m jazzed that it is one of the most read pieces of the year simply because it shares a process that I believe should be the starting point for moving from a culture of grading to a culture of feedback in schools — an essential shift that every school needs to start making and the topic covered in my newest book, which came out in November of this year.

 

Technology is a Tool.  Not a Learning Outcome — This post has been in darn near every Top Five Radical Reads lists for as long as I can remember.  Sharing a simple hand-drawn image that expresses my core belief that technology CAN’T be the starting point for our conversations about changing schools, this post and its companion image on Flickr have been viewed over 50,000 times in the last few years.  Something about this bit resonates with all y’all — and that’s cool.  I know that it keeps challenging my own thinking about teaching and learning with technology.

 

What are YOU Doing to Teach Students to Spot Fake News Stories? – Let’s start with a simple truth:  No matter what side of the political aisle you stand on, you HAVE to be troubled by the fact that fake news designed to peddle lies and influence voters is having an impact on elections in America.  That’s not the fault of crappy news outlets.  That’s the fault of lazy voters who do almost nothing to check the credibility of the sources that they are consuming.  In this bit, I detail the scope of the fake news problem, offer a series of tips for verifying news sources that I think every student should be taught, and then point readers to a complete lesson that you can purchase from my Teachers Pay Teachers store.

 

A Parent’s Reflection on School Letter Grades — While it has gotten me in trouble more than my fair share of times, I often write bits here on the Radical that point out the very real impact that destructive #edpolicy choices have on teachers and students.  I’ve been told more than once that doing so is a bad idea because “I’m turning off important people.”  This was one of the pieces that made those “important people” uncomfortable this year.

In it, I openly wonder about the impact that a C rating under our state’s “Excellent Public Schools” letter grading system will have on the culture of the school that my second grade daughter attends.  My goal in writing it was simple:  To point out that the things that I want out of a school as a parent go WAY BEYOND the things our state has chosen to measure and monitor.  Someone needs to say that out loud, right?

 

The Most Important Interview Question I Bet You’ve Never Asked — Let’s start with a simple truth:  I am a huge believer in the power of professional learning communities to change the practice of individual classroom teachers.  That’s because my OWN practice has been changed in deep and meaningful ways by the opportunity to reflect with peers.  But here’s the thing:  Ask most teachers and they are likely to tell you that PLCs are pointless — just another initiative that they hope will be passed over and thrown on the scrap heap of change.

One of the reasons for that pessimism is the failure on the part of school principals to fill their schools with people who truly are OPEN to the notion that there is real value in learning from others.  That’s an argument I make in this piece — which offers up the only question that I think is worth asking in an interview for a new teacher:  Describe a time when your thinking was deeply influenced by a colleague.

Some of my favorite posts of the year didn’t make it into the top five.  Give ’em a look, though.  You’ll get a sense for who I am as both a person and professional:

Are Grades Destroying My Six Year Old Kid?

Wonder = Joy (and Joy Should be Shared!)

Pockets of Innovation = Lack of Focus

The Best Feedback is Gathered, not Given

“The Curse of Our Online Lives”

After _______, What’s OUR Role in Promoting Peace?

 

In the end, 2016 has been nothing short of a wild ride — filled with new opportunities, new instructional experiments and new lessons learned, both personally and professionally.

Through it all, Radical Nation has been there — reading and reflecting and challenging and questioning.  For that, I continue to be incredibly grateful.  Here’s to hoping that you’ll stick with me into 2016.  I’d miss you if you were gone.

#gratzi