Category Archives: Tool Reviews

Tool Review: Quizlet Live

So here’s an interesting confession:  I am NOT a huge fan of teaching vocabulary.  I get that it is important — particularly in a content specific field like science where understanding individual terms is essential for fluent communication.  I just don’t like doing it.

Which is one of the reasons that I’ve tinkered with Quizlet over the years.  Quizlet has always made it easy to give kids multiple opportunities to practice their vocabulary.  Teachers create word sets by entering terms and adding — or selecting — definitions.  Quizlet does the rest, creating four or five different kinds of activities for student users that range from working with digital flashcards to playing a speed based matching game called Scatter.

Need an example of what this all looks like in action?

Check out this word set that my students are currently practicing with and tinker with the tools available to learners:

https://quizlet.com/_2f8q39

Quizlet upped its game recently by releasing a new activity called Quizlet Live that is pretty darn amazing.

Quizlet Live makes it possible for students to participate in a competitive vocabulary review game against their classmates from any device.

What makes Quizlet Live unique is that students compete on randomly assigned teams of three or four students.  Even better:  The correct answer for each question asked during the game appears on only ONE group member’s screen.  The result:  When a question is asked, teams need to first figure out what the correct answer is and then figure out which partner has the correct answer on their screen.

Here’s a short video introducing Quizlet Live:

We played it for the first time in class on Thursday and I’m sold.

Not only did my students enjoy practicing with their vocabulary words — something that middle schoolers rarely look forward to — but they enjoyed practicing with their classmates.  They worked with students they normally wouldn’t choose to work with, recognized that there were other experts in the room who could help them learn, came to rely on one another because they had no other choice, and celebrated victories together.

In many ways, Quizlet Live is a perfect blend of two other tools that I’ve experimented with over the years:  Kahoot and Socrative.

Like Kahoot — which I review here — my kids LOVED the competitive element of Quizlet Live.  They loved racing against other teams, trying to be the first to answer every question and to get bragging rights over their peers.

And like Socrative — which I review here — Quizlet Live encourages students to find the RIGHT answers to questions instead of rewarding random guessing by forcing teams that get wrong answers to start the entire game over AND to spend five seconds reviewing both the missed definition and the definition of the incorrect answer given.  My kids figured out quickly that there’s some truth to the notion that you have to go slow to go fast.  Thinking through answers together and being right — even if it took a little longer — was often the difference between finishing first and finishing last.

Are there limitations to Quizlet Live?  

Sure.  Probably the biggest limitation is that it is REALLY difficult to play the game productively if you don’t have a ton of devices in your classroom.  Even when students share devices with one partner, teams of three or four quickly swell to teams of six to eight.  That’s unproductive simply because it leads to some students doing a ton of work and some students sitting quietly, hitchhiking instead of participating.  I’m also not convinced that Quizlet Live can handle questions that move beyond simple recall and review of core facts or vocabulary words.

But my kids were JAZZED the entire time we were playing and BUMMED when our class period ended.  For a lesson designed to review essential vocabulary, that’s a pretty darn good outcome.

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Related Radical Reads:

Tool Review: Kahoot

Three #edtech Tools Worth Exploring Right Now

Blaming and Shaming Teachers for Low Level #edtech Practices

Tool Review: Blendspace by TES Teach

One of the challenges of teaching science to sixth graders is that many of the most common lab procedures and processes are new to them.  Everything from identifying constants and variables to using lab equipment properly can lead to a slew of questions and slow groups to a steady crawl.

That’s why I started tinkering with Blendspace — a digital tool that makes it possible for users to create a landing page filled with content that users can consume.  I figured that if I could point students to one site that could answer all of their questions, lab time would be more manageable for me and more productive for my kids.

Need to see a sample of Blendspace in action?  Check out this one, covering important information for a lab we are currently completing:

http://bit.ly/6sciptlab

Each tile on the Blendspace represents a piece of content that will help students to successfully complete their lab.  Students can work through the space in order from beginning to end by hitting the “Play” button at the top of the screen OR they can click on the icons in the bottom right hand corner of each tile to explore individual resources answering specific questions.

Creating my Blendspace was a breeze.

After planning out all the content that I thought my students would need in order to successfully complete our lab, I sat behind my cell phone camera to record and upload my videos directly to YouTube.  Adding those same videos to Blendspace tiles was a one-click process.  The other content — links to online tutorials or videos, links to individual Google Docs, text-based slides sharing directions and/or information — were just as easy to add.

Putting this Blendspace together — recording videos, organizing content, adding tiles, making a short link with Bitly — probably took about 90 minutes from start to finish.  That’s TOTALLY worth it if it helps students to answer their own questions during our labs AND if I plan to use the same lab in future years.  Better yet, my Blendspace will help other teachers on my learning team who are teaching the same lab — saving everyone a ton of time and energy.

I see potential in Blendspace because it’s a tool that solves a specific problem for me.

Providing students with recorded directions and organized sets of materials for every lab promotes independence and frees me up to interact more meaningfully with the kids in my classroom.

Whaddya’ think?

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Related Radical Reads:

Tool Review: Screencastify

Tool Review:  Google Expeditions

Tool Review: Edpuzzle

I’m Planning a Pokemon Go Rally for My Middle Schoolers

I have a confession to make:  I spent the first two weeks of July rolling my eyes as I read article after article in my social stream about the “transformational power of Pokemon Go.”  I had the app on my phone, I’d caught more than a few Pidgeys, and hit up more than a few Poke stops — but to me, there was nothing truly transformational about it.  In fact, I was pretty sure that I’d delete the app before school even started.

But then I showed it to my seven year old daughter, and she was hooked!

Something about the clever monster names, colors and actions caught her attention and it’s no exaggeration to say that it has enriched our lives.  Each day, the first thing she asks me is, “Dad, want to go for a walk and catch some Pokemon?!”  Those moments together are worth everything to me — including the extra $25/month I had to plunk down because I blew up my data plan.

And when my sixth graders started school on Monday,  I realized that I just couldn’t ignore Pokemon this year.  As soon as I mentioned that I was a Level 16 trainer with a pretty hyped up Vaporeon, stories started.  “Oh yeah?  Well I have two Snorlaxes!” said one girl.  “My dad wasted like 15 Poke balls on a Pidgeotto.  He stinks” said another.  Needless to say, catching Pokemon is well and truly a middle school craze — and that makes it worth exploring.

Now don’t get me wrong:  I STILL don’t think there’s anything transformational about chasing imaginary pocket monsters around.  Pokemon Go ISN’T the silver bullet that we’ve all been waiting for to save education.

But I have hatched a plan to use it as a fun team building activity.  In just a few short weeks, I’m going to host my first ever Pokemon Go Rally.  

Here’s the handout:

Handout – Pokemon Go Rally

The basic plan is to invite parents and their kids to work together in teams to catch Pokemon at a local hot spot that offers free Wifi.  My guess is that our first rally will happen at the local mall, given that it is like 105 degrees outside here in North Carolina.  To make the game more challenging and to encourage strategic thinking, I’m limiting:

  • The time that players have to capture Pokemon.
  • The number of Poke Balls that they can use during the rally.
  • The extras — incense, lucky eggs, lures — that can be used to increase capture rates.

I’m also awarding bonus points for a range of different captures.  Participants who hatch the most eggs or catch the most Rattatas can earn a huge bump to their final point tallies. 

All of these limiting factors will force participants to think critically about their choices.  If you have only 60 Poke balls, can you really burn four of them trying to catch a Pidgey with a Combat Power of 30?  If hatching an egg is worth 100 bonus points, would walking further be a better strategy than hanging out at a Poke stop where a lure has been set to catch whatever happens to show up?  Will staying in the well-trafficked areas of the Rally Grounds be a better strategy than traveling as much ground as possible to get away from the other teams who are playing?

In the end, I’m hoping to get a ton of parents and kids to come out and play together for an hour.  If it works, it will be an easy way to build a bit of team spirit.  Better yet, it will be easy to replicate.  All I’ll need is a list of public spaces with free Wifi!

Can you see my unique technology lens here?  What matters to me is building a classroom community by bringing people together for a shared experience.  Pokemon Go makes that possible.  My goal is driving my technology choices — not the other way around.

Technology is a tool.  Not a learning outcome.

So whaddya’ think?  I know this isn’t transformational, but is it worthwhile?  Is it something you’d think about doing?

Looking forward to your feedback.

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Related Radical Reads:

Technology is a Tool.  Not a Learning Outcome.

More on Technology is a Tool.  Not a Learning Outcome.

Are Kids REALLY Motivated by Technology?

Celebrate Your TEACHING Geeks.  Not your TECH Geeks.

 

 

 

Edpuzzle Just Made Transitioning from Zaption Simple.

A few weeks back, I shared an example of digital resilience here on the Radical when I learned that Zaption — one of my favorite tools for creating digital tutorials for my students — was going out of business in early September.  

To be honest, I was devastated.  Zaption tutorials have become the first step that I take in my classroom whenever I want to reteach individual concepts to my students or to provide enrichment for kids who are ready to move on before our lessons even begin.  Stated more simply, Zaption tutorials made differentiation doable — and I had invested a ton of time and energy into creating tutorials on dozens of topics connected to my required curriculum.  Losing that work was hard to imagine.

That’s when I stumbled across Edpuzzle — a service that makes it possible for users to create the same kinds of digital tutorials.  Better yet, Edpuzzle is seamlessly integrated with Google Classroom — making it possible for users to import their class rosters, assign content, and track progress back and forth between the two platforms.  For a guy like me working in a Google Apps for Education district, that is an awesome feature that Zaption didn’t offer.

After tinkering with Edpuzzle for just a few minutes, I knew that I’d found a great replacement for Zaption.  Creating videos and tracking progress is just as easy in Edpuzzle as it was in Zaption. Edpuzzle users can also ask the same kinds of questions and include the same kinds of content in their digital tutorials as Zaption users.  In fact, the final products made possible by Edpuzzle are nearly identical to the final products made possible by Zaption.

The only hitch:  I wasn’t all that excited about recreating the 30+ tutorials that I had stored over in Zaption.  Ain’t nobody got time for that.

That’s when Edpuzzle saved the day yet again, dropping me a message in Twitter that pointed me to a new feature that they’d just finished developing:  One click transitioning from Zaption to Edpuzzle.

Here’s the details:

 

Do you see how ridiculously valuable that is to Zaption users like me?

Thanks to the work of the folks over at Edpuzzle, losing Zaption isn’t going to hurt me at all.  By making it possible to automatically import my Zaption content into their service, Edpuzzle has saved me a ton of time AND made it possible for me to continue providing differentiated learning experiences for the kids in my classroom.  That matters.

#grateful

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Related Radical Reads:

Goodbye Zaption. Hello Edpuzzle.

Zaption Makes Differentiation Doable

Being Digitally Resilient

In Celebration of Teaching Geeks

 

Goodbye Zaption. Hello Edpuzzle

One of the most important lessons for teachers living in a digital world to learn is how to be digitally resilient — or persistent in the face of the kinds of glitches and hiccups that happen when you are working with old technology, unreliable infrastructure, or free tools.  If you can’t persist despite challenges, you may as well stop using technology in the classroom because those challenges are inevitable.

I had a first hand experience with the need to be digitally resilient today when I learned that Zaption — one of my favorite tools for creating differentiated learning experiences for students — had been sold and will be shutting down in early September.  Given that I’ve got about 30 different Zaption videos about content across my curriculum that I use for initial reteaching when students struggle to master standards and for providing enrichment to students who master content early in my class, I was more than a little devastated!

But here’s the thing:  I knew that there had to be other tools LIKE Zaption that I could turn to and start rebuilding my collection of tutorials.  

And ten minutes after finding out that Zaption was closing up shop, I stumbled across Edpuzzle — which offers the same feature set as Zaption — the ability to create annotated video tutorials, the ability to ask students questions and automatically grade their answers, the ability to see how many times students watched a tutorial.  Better yet, Edpuzzle offers seamless two-way integration with Google Classroom — a Google Apps for Education product that has become the primary hub for all of the online work that I’m sharing with students on my learning team.

I signed up, created a tutorial that is almost identical to a tutorial that I had already made in Zaption, imported my class rosters from Google Classroom, and pushed out the new tutorial to my students in no time.

Now don’t get me wrong:  I’m bummed that Zaption is gone.  I invested a ton of time in creating tutorials for my kids and I’ll have to go back and do that work all over again.  

But I’m not giving up because (1). there are plenty of other tools available to me and (2). the core behavior that I care about — providing quick reteaching and enrichment opportunities to students that are self-directed and created in advance — still matters.

That’s digital resilience in action.

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Related Radical Reads:

Zaption Makes Differentiation Doable

Being Digitally Resilient

In Celebration of Teaching Geeks